Categories for History of Medicine

Victoria Sweet, author of ‘God’s hotel’, on the importance of history in medical training and clinical practice.

June 3, 2012 10:29 am Published by Comments Off on Victoria Sweet, author of ‘God’s hotel’, on the importance of history in medical training and clinical practice.

Earlier this week I had the privilege of interviewing Dr. Victoria Sweet, former PhD graduate student in history of medicine in this department, and now UCSF Clinical Professor of Medicine and author of the book God’s Hotel (previously featured on the DAHSM blog, read relevant post here). Her book tells the story of what is probably the last alms-house in... View Article

The efficient way of slow medicine: the story of the last US almshouse through the eyes of doctor and historian of medicine Victoria Sweet

May 24, 2012 12:31 pm Published by Comments Off on The efficient way of slow medicine: the story of the last US almshouse through the eyes of doctor and historian of medicine Victoria Sweet

Victoria Sweet, associate clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and former PhD student in History of Medicine at DAHSM, is one of a kind, in many regards. Just to name one, Victoria is unique in having spent several months at the beginning of her career as a medical doctor looking for a position that would... View Article

Dorothy Porter lecturing at the Wellcome Library on ‘Creative Disability and the Shaking Palsy’

May 20, 2012 7:53 pm Published by Comments Off on Dorothy Porter lecturing at the Wellcome Library on ‘Creative Disability and the Shaking Palsy’

We are glad to announce that the honor of the 10th Wellcome LibraryRoy Porter lecture has been bestowed on our Dorothy Porter, Professor in the History of Health Sciences, who will present her current research on 'Creative Disabililty and the Shaking Palsy: Approaching a history of Parkinson's Disease'.

Writing, Filling, Using, and Abusing the Prescription in Modern America.

May 3, 2012 9:41 am Published by Comments Off on Writing, Filling, Using, and Abusing the Prescription in Modern America.

DAHSM is glad to announce the publication of a new book, "Prescribed. Writing, Filling, Using, and Abusing the Prescription in Modern America" edited by Elizabeth S. Watkins, professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the History of Health Sciences Program at UCSF, and Jeremy A. Greene, Assistant Professor of the History of Science, and the Harvard Medical School Division of Pharmacoepidemiology, and Pharmacoeconomics at Brigham and Women's Hospital.The book, titled "Prescribed" and aptly subtitled "Writing, Filling, Using, and Abusing the Prescription in Modern America" is a first of its kind in exploring the politics of therapeutic authority and the relations between knowledge and practice in modern medicine. The tale of the prescription is one of constant struggles over and changes in medical and therapeutic authority and, as pointed out by Watkins and Greene, America has had a long love affair with the prescription. It is much more than the written “script” or a manufactured medicine, professionally dispensed and taken, and worth hundreds of millions of dollars a year. As an object, it is uniquely illustrative of the complex relations among the producers, providers, and consumers of medicine in modern America. Stakeholders across the biomedical enterprise have alternately upheld and resisted, supported and critiqued, and subverted and transformed the power of the prescription. Who prescribes? What do they prescribe? How do they decide what to prescribe? These questions set a society-wide agenda that changes with the times and profoundly shifts the medical landscape. Examining drugs individually, as classes, and as part of the social geography of health care, contributors to this volume explore the history of prescribing, including over-the-counter contraceptives, the patient’s experience of filling opioid prescriptions, restraints on physician autonomy in prescribing antibiotics, the patient package insert, and other regulatory issues in medicine during postwar America.

Focus on: the unique history of homeopathic medicine in Mexico

April 18, 2012 9:25 am Published by Comments Off on Focus on: the unique history of homeopathic medicine in Mexico

Homeopathic medicine has had an intriguing and unique history in Mexico. While in many countries homeopathy and conventional or allopathic medicine have uncomfortably co-existed, during the first decades of the 20th century, Mexico’s Escuela Nacional de Medicine Homeopatica (ENHM) was incorporated within the Universidad Autonoma Nacional de Mexico (UNAM). This symbolic merging of the two schools, which granted homeopathy legitimacy... View Article

‘Superstitions in Medicine’ mural by Bernard Zakheim at UCSF Parnassus.

April 13, 2012 9:39 am Published by Comments Off on ‘Superstitions in Medicine’ mural by Bernard Zakheim at UCSF Parnassus.

he panel is one of two sets of frescoes at UCSF Parnassus campus, for a total of twelve panels, the other being the Toland Hall frescoes (and the header picture of this blog) which depict early California medical history in ten consecutive panels. The murals were painted in 1938 by artist Bernard Zakheim, a student of Diego Rivera who worked on the Coit Tower murals in San Francisco, with financial support from the New Deal's Works Progress Administration.

Plague, Fear, and Politics in San Francisco’s Chinatown

April 10, 2012 12:02 pm Published by Comments Off on Plague, Fear, and Politics in San Francisco’s Chinatown

A physician and historian, Guenter B. Risse, professor emeritus of the history of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and an affiliate professor at the University of Washington, Seattle, just published a new book with John Hopkins University Press titled ‘Plague, fear, and politics in San Francisco’s Chinatown’. When health officials in San Francisco discovered bubonic plague in... View Article

Straightening up the records: history not only taught, but required at UCSF.

April 5, 2012 6:32 pm Published by Comments Off on Straightening up the records: history not only taught, but required at UCSF.

The story continues! After our post yesterday on this blog on the necessary correction to Rick Santorum’s statement that UC campuses, including UCSF, do not teach American history, an official press release just came out today with additional clarifications. In particular, in the article by Jason Bardi reports that after hearing MSNBC commentator Rachel Maddow on Tuesday night pointing out... View Article

Last modified: April 5, 2012